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borders supplied a map that shows the increasingly hostile environment for journalist. the areas you see the darker colors, those are the most dangerous areas. and every day we are seeing violence against reporters in russia, egypt, venezuela, mexico. pretty much around the world. is enough being done to help them and what can be done? >> no, i don't think enough is being done. if you take the case of egypt, the arrest of journalists and bloggers is nothing new. the same is true of journalists in saudi arabia, we have seen some in china being arrested left right and center. what can be done, leader in the free world can speak on behalf of these judgists, raise their names in meetings condition aid to improvements in human rights and i think collectively, if we stand up for these political prisoners and journalists we cannot only see their release but the gradual reform of liberal societies. just relently i had my own experience a heated confrontation with iran's foreign minister over the imprisonment of one who has spent four years in prison for criticizing the regime and a outcry. he wa
: in the new environment, our party faces many severe challenges. >> since then, the president's promised big reform, meant to shift the economy from fast paced to sustainable growth. those reforms are sure to be on the agenda at the national people's congress where investors hope the new administration will show they plan to walk the talk of reforms. investment house barclay's expects the government's anti-corruption drive to pick up speed after president xi jinping speeded up a campaign aimed at rooting out -- the brokerage, like many other firms hopes to see changes that would make the economy more account oriented. measures to help liberalize the financial sector and allow the currency to trade more freely. >> china policymakers are interested in bringing in more exchange rate flexibility. they need to have that before they open up their capital economy. >> reforms have raised awareness that this environmental problem can quickly become a social one. the pollution is a rut of years of double digit growth, no longer expected with the new leadership. most investors believe the government wi
groundbreaking research to fight disease, protect the environment and develop new technology. it enhances the administration's management efforts to deliver a government that is more efficient and supportive of economic growth. and it will expand opportunity for all-americans. it doubles the maximum value of the earned income tax credit to encourage people to enter the workforce. and makes high quality preschool available to every four year old. and drive workforce training. it will focus on the primary drivers of long term debt and deficits. it builds on the forms of the affordable care act and continues to slow health care cost growth while improving the quality. it will curb tax breaks that benefit the wealthiest. it calls for pro-growth immigration reform. the deficit has been cut in half under the president's leadership. by paying for the new investments and tackling the true challenges, the budget continues with progress reducing deficits as a share of gdp to 1.6% by 2024. with regard to the issues of stabilizing our debt to gdp ratio that is in 2015 and we start a declining path. t
to the government to take a number of specific measures to further improve the business environment can cause extent for their products reviews for policy reasons. according to the president's commission the format of inspections in the country will be radically revised to exclude all unnecessary requirements as a result the total number of requirements will reduce by more than thirty percent. we hit the pin and the practical form. scheduled inspections will be canceled starting to wear first two thousand fifteen only goes on to new ritual really have a high probability of violations of law will be subject to inspections. if an entrepreneur of the phils only to requirements inspection agency should not come and it's all starting to wear first two thousand fifteen the liquidation procedure for small to medium size businesses will be simplified the general prosecutor's office will provide the national chamber of the newest be accessed on information in relation to business. hooper computers issue the permit issuance procedure will be completed in at least a hundred forty kinds of permits will be in el
regulatory environment, it is very difficult for banks to josep juy taking a risk if it defaults and it will take them three years to resolve that situation. in states like california, lender can get sued by a defaulted bar were for making a relatively minor error in the servicing or lending process. a lot of risks. >> the regulatory environment is not helping. what should the regulatory environment be? you have to have some rules. >> some of the rules were put in place that are very good. contact for the bar were. putting in place a really normative standard for making a loan. disclosure. all the things you heard about during the crisis. >> what about for the banks? agree -- we totally don't need to see the new agency that came out of the dodd frank law telling the banks with the price of mortgages ought to be. we should not have legislated the way that prepayment penalties work. as a low credit score bar were its mortgage come your score goes up immediately. another lender will come in and refinance you. that first lender will lose money. they're not going to do that. >> mark f
the next few quarters, driving profitability as well. number three, the environment as a whole, it seems that investors continue to discount the upside and are very cautious. we will not see returns like 2013, but we are still bullish as a whole. >> in the last conference call we kept hearing about companies guiding downwards. so much m&a. how do you account for that? >> that is a concern, not everything is rosy and perfect, but there are concerns out there and you have seen an environment over the last few years where every quarter they learn a is part of thech regulatory environment that we are in. they overpromise and underdeliver and could potentially be on the hook for money. it down. which is not to say that you should ignore these things. you want to look at it. but you need to do your homework and look at what is happening in terms of corporate earnings. generally speaking, and our view, if the company continues to take market share away from competitors in in industry that continues to grow, they must reflect in the numbers at some point. maybe not this quarter or the next quart
see in the world bank called the enabling environment that is a socially the trust of the businesses in the rule of law. and there's not a shortage of money. they are regional investors who would like to put money into the question is can they trust the rules of the game to do that and that govern in particular. minerals are going to be a magic bullet, but the oil and gas resources that have been discovered recently are quite immense and it isn't inconceivable that in ten to 15 years we underwrite the cost of sustaining stability and services within the country. in conclusion let's move from the quick fix is in a magic bullet and understanding the peace and stability and governance would be at the peace of stability and it is the many small wins rather than the deal that would be liver on that for the afghans at the question is can a politics deliver what the afghans believe in more than 90% of the leaving the law and order that future to realize it. >> thank you. david? >> thank you very much, andrew. it's a great pleasure to be here and i will join you and others in thinking asap i
you indicate that the unemployment rate, in his current environment, with 6.7% -- with longer unemployment, is not like 6.6% unemployment in normal times? >> but mike, how do you communicate that? >> it will be difficult to do that and you will have speeches you make to give people guidance on what is going forward. i want to ask about the statement of inflation not being a problem. betting that inflation will rise over the coming months and the question is, how much is slack is there. on bloomberg surveillance tomorrow -- they argued it -- he will argue, this is much more dangerous than people think. saywill see chairman yellen that they will follow strict policy that will look at the labor market for reasons that we mentioned but this is not the only thing they will look at. they will go day to day to make sure they are not too soft. >> what kind of market can ben bernanke handoff to janet yellen? >> i would much rather be in her spot than his spot in 2008. i think that ben bernanke did a wonderful job of communicating that we are moving to tapering, and handing chairperson
an additional grievance to talk about on social media. theoon as he lost information environment, he began to bleed supporters. when that happened, use on acceleration of the opposition. >> the media's first focused on the terrible and tragic deaths of roughly 78 people in the square but the real story was the loss of political support by virtue of being connected to the internet. >> the me talk about the whole new prize you are offering. explain that. the whole book is about how the internet can solve global problems. how will be a factor in the do come forward to this million dollar prize. i am literally putting my money where my mouth is. >> this is your money. >> this is a personal donation. google is doing things in this area and many are, as well. there are a series of problems -- empowerment of individuals, anti-censorship, illicit trafficking in illicit networks. technologies can be used to make those worse or better. i personally want to fund the people who are trying to make the problems better for citizens. there are plenty of heroes, we want to find them all. look at africa, fo
difficult intelligence environment to operate in after all, the russians have been so sort of nervous about western and in particular american presence in ukraine and other states on their borders. they threw out people from nonprofits and nongovernmental organizations that were providing sort of social support and democratic training and leadership training because they believe that they were age ents of the american government. nothing could be further from the truth. but it tells you something about this being a real tense environment. you go to all your technical means of intelligence. satellite, electronics surveillance. you be sure that all the assets of the u.s. government and our allies around the world are being used to understand military what the order of battle is, exactly what assets they're moving closer and into the crimea. but spider marks is quite right. this is an invasion. it is what it is. and to sort of threaten that in june we won't show up to the g 8 isn't really -- tells you we don't have a lot of leverage over the russian. let's remember the president and the white
of the white house, marking what could be the largest youth sit in on the environment in a generation. >> we are here to march to the white house and form one of the largest accessible disobedience for climate ever. hundreds of young people all came here from all over the country, 42 states, to show president obama the keystone xl is not ok and not in our national interest. than 80nts for more colleges rallied at georgetown university and then marched to the white house were some unfurled a black tarp and laid on the sidewalk to create a human oil spill. hundreds locked themselves to the white house fence before being arrested. president obama is expected to make a decision on whether to approve the keystone xl pipeline in the coming months. more on the protest and the pipeline later in the broadcast. the venezuelan president is facing a new round of protests against his government. despite the carnival holiday, thousands of opposition protesters marched and then clashed with police sunday in the capital caracas. at least 70 people have died in bed as well as worst unrest for a decade. -- at
, effectively? >> well, it's hard. it's going to be a significant trading range environment. the market will correct back on a repeating basis. we'll get a period where the market doesn't accomplish a heck of a lot. that's all you should expect. >> you watched janet yellen yesterday. did he provide the confidence that you would have wanted? and the reason i ask is because historically, if you just do the math, every time we get a new chair in this role, we usually have some form of a correction within six months. and the question that i keep wondering is whether we have that correction or it's still to come. >> i think, you know, investors tend to react to the unexpected, not the expected. and yesterday, the messaging was steady as she goes. so i think for now, we're in good shape. the march meeting, unless data falls off the cliff, investors will expect and will treat another $10 billion in tapering to occur. so i think we hand off from bernanke to yellen in this case may be a little different. because she was pretty much on tune with the dovishness of the fed and there hasn't been a f
, talks were dominated by a cooling economy and rising concerns about the environment. tom, manufacturing pmi over the weekend fell slightly. is that a sign of the reaction of weakening growth? is a bit of both. at pmi trajectory came in 50.2, down from 50.5 in january. so it is still slightly above the 50 mark, which is improving from deteriorating conditions. deceleration in the manufacturing sector. the big question is is this to do with february, which this year had the chinese new year holiday, or is it a reflection -- a reflection of genuine problems in the manufacturing sector? pmi?at is the reaction to has rebranded to past 55 from the record low of 53 in january. theome evidence that in domestic economy, and the services sector, it is actually doing slightly better. yuan hasrse, the weakened significantly over concerns. have the npc kicking off this week. what does this mean for the government's broader growth strategy? >> one of the concerns is that a weakening yuan is a reflection of lower investor confidence in china. be deliberate strategy by the people's bank of china. they
position to capitalize and stay upon the improving housing environment in the u.s. >> as you pointed out closing the sales gap, if you had two stocks to buy you'd buy both of them? >> i think by the way i position it, both companies are in the right position to benefit from housi housing. home depot is better positioned. >> gross margin 44.6%, is that a number in line with what you were the examining in. >> that's a good number just like with home depot, a lot of disruption with the weather but in both cases the gross margins held up well despite what could have been a negative makeshift in margin products. >> the at the end of the day you look at the weather situation, this is a company that probably helped out by the weather because they were able to respond quickly? >> probably. the way i think about it, it was probably some weather benefit, a lot of snow removal type products but the real key is going to be as temperatures warm, as the spring finally comes there will be a lot of pent of demand and repair spending at lowe's and home depot and that will be positive for the first quarte
to the environment by the way it is being grown in california. i agree that california might get around this, but it is doing a lot of damage to the environment the way it is being done in california. as it turns out, i did see that piece. the legalizers would say that is why this needs to be legalized. you go out into the wilderness in california, yes, they are using tremendous amounts of pesticides, herbicides and who knows what. the environmental this action is quite phenomenal. this is marijuana growth outside the law. the legalizers would say that is one more reason to bring it under a state jurisdiction, because that way the environmental benefits even to legalizing marijuana. piece. great if people are interested in this as an issue, go on mother jones. host: a tweet from a viewer -- guest: which is what happened last week and san francisco. a mom had her daughter set up in of a medical marijuana dispensary and sold out 157 boxes in record time. excited -- aside, what are the under industries -- other industries popping up because of colorado? guest: that is the joke that' frito sales
and polite and france to the environments. mix all of this china's economy continues to twelve presidential campaign and his administration are pushing ahead with reforms as a team for long term stability. one insight and analysis on weekends. one of the series and china will to reform an age heroes from jakarta is covering this story in and they should in today's china's biggest annual political event kicks off right here in the capital and preparations are fully underway. one of the biggest concerns right now its security as thousands of representatives of dr here in beijing. there's even a bigger security presence because of this weekend's deadly attack in the southern city of twenty. isn't that what i saw around the meeting venue. the main square in the center of teaching is also the center of political power. i've read it to the west is the great hall of the people would just once a year china's biggest issues i put forth prioritize and discuss. this composition egos and gathering in that building in a few days from now to determine the country's future direction. and security all arou
environment. it brings much greater value to our customers. >> there have been very successful tech ipos recently. the environment seems quite good. why not take advantage of that now? >> is more than about the short-term money. about building something great to last year look at our customers. 95,000 customers large and small. we are putting 40,000 unique users on a day. this is what we're focused on. the thing that is whipping in the win for us is the tremendous it -- return on investment our customers are getting. john will be speaking at our momentum conference. 150 countries and on average, they saved $30 per document and have reduced their turnaround time by 21 days. >> it sounds like what you're hinting at is when you're at a public company, there is a pressure to focus on the quarter is focusing on the ground game and not the long ball. is that what happens still at public companies? >> i think it allows our entire leadership team to focus on our customers, and our partners, as public to when you are a company and you focus on quarter after quarter after quarter. we are taking ad
of strategic partners. that is fundamental to our strategy. to thrive in a heterogeneous environment. been successful tech ipos recently. the environment seems good. why not take advantage? >> it is more than about the short-term money. it is about building something great to last. we look at our customers -- have 95,000 customers large and small. we are putting 40,000 unique users on a day. this is what we're focused on. the thing that is really whipping the wind for us is the tremendous return on investment that our customers are getting. john henshaw will be speaking at our momentum conference. he is with hp. save $30erage, they per document and have reduce turnaround time by 21 days. >> it sounds like what you're hinting at is that when you are at a public of any is that there is a pressure to focus on the you areand that focusing on the ground game, not the long ball. is that what happens at public companies? >> it allows our entire leadership team to focus on our customers and on our partners as opposed to when you are a public company and you are focused on quarter after quarter aft
expanding. the markets are going to find the environment stuff. what is the concern china or deflation? >> i don't think there will be deflation and i think we will see a long time of low growth. i don't think inflation will be a problem. of alarm also it's bells and i like to put the word demand in front of deflation. and thatalling wages means following command and a negative spiral. it is not just falling prices. is lots of sectors. you see groups and things like that. falling realu have wages that that is the problem. the cycle that japan went through and if you do not touch it at the right time, it is difficult to turn around. are we in a scenario like that? deflation and the specter of it hanging over us unless handled correctly. >> one of the characteristics of japan that contributed to the slow growth was a rapidly-aging population and people having a lower propensity to consume. that changed the balance of growth in the economy. there are european economies that have rapidly aging populations and it appears to be a social issue and an issue that has a profound economic impact and lo
for lebanon's geostrategic environment. if the east and west agree that this must be a peace offul zone because there are important resources here, now actually moving forward on what's the economic value of this, the first thing is to figure out how to get it to market. the market is effectively europe. the original approach was or the plan was certainly to take it over land to turkey which would mean through syria as long as the war there is raging, you cannot do that. but that is the most cost effective i way. and i would indicate that part of the war for syria has to do with who's going to control the future of eastern mediterranean energy. the other way to do it which israel is exploring is whether to do it through lng, you know, whether cyprus and put it on ships or possibly from cyprus an undersea pipeline to turkey and then turkey gets it to market. so it gets into a lot of geopoll to tucks and relations. -- geopoll ticks and relations. if lebanon could get this to market and sell it, that would be -- well, the energy itself, the gas, if it's extracted, the first use of it is di
-quarter revenue. "turbo" were disappointing. this is the most competitive feature environment he's ever seen. they will withdraw world cup t-shirts after they complained it a link to the country with sexual activity. the world's largest --second-largest sports company said they were only available in the u.s.. >> 643 a.m. in london. brazil is also the king of car crime, bad news for owners but makerews for the israeli of car tracking devices reporting record earnings largely thanks to brazil's auto theft explosion. middle eastern attic or elliott gotkine has more. with theen speaking chief executive? >> their biggest market thanks to this explosion of auto theft, brazil is just as important. of 10,000 vehicles are stolen, 40% worse than the second worst country, south africa. the chief executive says it will continue to be a very good market for them. very attractive to us because of two main reasons. brazil is becoming a more western company. more insurance companies are involved in more car manufacturers are involved. more people are using cars. on the other hand, still emerging markets. ,
need to change the environment that we live in. so that means better policies, access and availability to healthier food for all americans, so in underserved areas as well as privileged areas. and many efforts are under way to make that happen. >> is there any way, you mentioned the difference between what's happening in underserved areas as well as privileged areas. and you also mention the change in the women, infants and children nutrition program. how much of that can you break out. >> i know this is a small incident but how much do you know in these kinds of programs is it having an effect? >> well, we mow that children who are eligible for assistance like wic serve underprivileged chrn and those changes are very important for them. but if we pull apart the recent data we're talking about now and the decline in the obesity rates it starts to unravel when you look at the disparities. soรง we know that white children have lower rates than black children and hispanic children. and the disparities are quite striking. and that tells us more effort has to be put into reaching underserv
in the environment, who knows what the next eight months will bring. >> fair enough. candidate recruiting is everything. i remember various conversati s conversations. i know on one hand you've had people that you've had conversations with, that have said, you know what, talk to me in '16 when they think it will be more democrats, knowing democratic voters, hillary clinton at the top of the ticket, the shutdown, it got you a few candidates you didn't think you would get because of the environment change in that small period of time. but have you found that you still are struggling getting some people off the fence because they'd rather run in a presidential year? >> no, not at all. in fact, you went through the list. what unifies these top-tier candidates right now is the fact that they are problem solvers. you know, we didn't have to recruit many of them. they recruited themselves because they'd had it with the shutdowns, with republican recklessness and irresponsibility. they are problem solvers in battleground districts. this is our initial rollout. there will be more. we'll have a ve
dispute settlement procedures and rules and enforcement of new obligations upon environment and labor. now, let me turn very quickly to the ttip negotiations. i have a little lesson that i can say on this because they are at an earlier stage of negotiations. though they are also important because the transatlantic economic relationship is our most significant commercial relationship. it's not our most significant trade partnership. the tpp actually is more valuable in that front, but we are talking about over a trillion dollars of two-way trade in goods and services between the united states and the european union, and over $4 trillion in foreign direct investment in each other's market. so it is a huge, huge adventure. the ttip negotiators seek to eliminate tariffs and substantial reduce nontariff barriers in trade and investment. that's a traditional part of the agenda. but as miriam noted, there's also ambitious goals with regard to coordinating or harmonizing regulatory policies affecting trade in goods and services. and that's what the biggest payoff could come very hard to estimate t
is they actually know who you are in a banking environment without having to use a password, just based on .our bio metric interaction they came to us and it was competitive. putting $3 million together and the way it works is we aggregate the investors who go on to our site and see a presentation from the company and watch a rep -- webinar, and they decide and start from $10,000 up. you can try to pick the next whatsapp. it is critical to mention you have got to build a portfolio. this stuff is so risky. you have to diversify. if you do not have 5, 10, or 15 of the companies, you're not doing it right. today ormpany started even in the last few years, do you see their equity strategy as acquisitions or going the ipo route? >> people always prefer ipo because you can build real value and continue building the company. an ipo is another funding event to raise money and better valuation so you continue to build value. most ipos are not showing several others -- selling shareholders. there are a lot of them in israel. 800 are bought for each woman goes public. we have a lot of companies traded in new
at an environment and public works committee hearing on adapting to climate change argued that we'd all be better off if the glaciers just went away. if they just melted away. after all, he told the committee, we evolved at the equator in a climate where freezing weather did not exist. it could be said that frost and ice are the enemies of life. he continued, "obviously if the glaciers stop melting, there will be no more meta-wall street from them -- no more melt water from them, so are you saying that you want the glaciers to stop melting? en this where would the irrigation water come from i say, let the glaciers melt." that's the witness the republicans put up. let the glaciers melt. i guess he missed the difference between seasonal melting, whose annual rhythms fill our streams and rivers for drinking water and fishing and farming and glaciers outright melting away. now, mr. president, there's another little trick the deniers like to play when it's or a little snow falls here in washington or back in their home states, they say, how could there be global warming when it is cold out? and, yes,
of the political environment. they are not becoming friends with the u.s., but they do want to reach a deal with them. >> tell us more about that political and by amendment. organizations must take into account what politicians are saying to their own populations. on the domestic political landscape. the situation in iran, does it allow for a deal at the moment? >> in the sense that this majorityrepresents a of the support of the population. what is at stake are the radical conservatives who are against the deal. they are still very powerful in some editions of parliament and other institutions. they are trying to do anything that they can to stop this policy. thethe supreme leader, for time being, wants to go on negotiating with the u.s.. >> broadly we know what a permanent deal might look like. iran would increase enrichment to a certain level. right now they are enriching uranium at five percent rather than 20%. in exchange for lifting economic sanctions. as a researcher and specialist on this issue, what is the nitty-gritty that you are looking for? what is the sticking point? >> in a s
scheduled months ago. but obviously given the environment, nobody is confidentably looking at that. we know the ukrainian -- comfortably looking at that. border line in that area where the war games are going, the north and the east of the country, and it indicates, del, that there is a real concern here in kiev that this may spread beyond crimea, that there may be designs on ukraine itself. del. >> and phil it must be an uneasy evening in kiev. just a few days ago they were celebrating what they believe was a new government. what is happening there right now? >> well, you're absolutely right. the anxiety levels in ceefn are huge. the people are back on the streets in maidan. they are very concerned about what the russians may be doing. we know that they are making pleas to the international community. the international community is responding at least in terms of bolstering morale. the british foreign secretary was here today, and he said that russia must respect ukraine's territorial integrity. we know that secretary of state kerry will be coming here for very much the same reason, to giv
in the long term. the short term, sure there is a risk off environment that may see more volatility. >> i assume, andres, russia is included and the stock market was down 12% or so today. if you're in a general emerging markets fund, you're going to feel it, aren't you? >> absolutely. i think short term you'll see -- you'll take a hit there and in the next couple weeks. having said that, this is also going to create opportunities for long-term investors because not all these countries put in the emerging market index are the same. for instance, indiana is in the emerging market index is one of the countries that i favor at this point over the next two or three years, yet, it was down 1.5%. doesn't have a lot to do with ukraine or russia, the economy doesn't. it was down. so it should create opportunities. you need to differentiate between the ri opportunity. >> what kind of investm changes should investors make? emerging markets, we just talked about that. investors have stock in big u.s. multi nationals that have a lot of trade with europe, which would be impacted by this ukrainian situa
and blind development. we must strengthen the economic environment and resolve to take forceful measures to complete this challenging task. >> now, we heard the announcements from before and there are many people who are worried about whether or not the government at the end of the day is really going to be willing to sacrifice growth in order to try to push through some of these reforms and address some of on these issues, not only on pollution, but also on debt. in terms of pollution, people are saying that if you really want to shut down a lot of these factory webs you could end up with a lot of workers who don't have any place to go. that is one of the main concerns that could actually leave some questions in people's minds as to whether or not the government will be able to push ahead and make these changes, julia. >> thank you. and if i also noticed a 12.5% rise in their defense budget, too. we've seen expressions of concern before the japanese, which is perhaps surprising. is that a waste of money? what's the feedback been on that rise? i know it's something they seem to do everyt
and environment program. jacob, is there much in the way of economic leverage at the u.s. holds in russia? >> cared to the e.u. in my opinion no. you like in europe, for instance, you could move to targeted freezes because a lot of russian least similar to what the former ukraine cocaine leadership had in europe, they had money inside the e.u. and that could be frozen. they don't have as far as i know much money in the u.s. so no, there isn't much. >> how is russia enmeshed in the economy of e.u. and europe more broadly? >> indeed, but the point is that the current situation isn't purely economic. when speaking just about the economy, western countries, european countries are interested in keeping close ties to russia in importing russian gas and exporting technology and investing into huge russian potential. but at the moment since last week we have geopolitical military situation and it prevails on economic. that is why european leaders change their minds and their statement become more and more strict, and more and more firm against russian invasion into ukraine. >> certainly as valeri
that has confidently mastered its difficult environment. the sea shaped dutch society. but 80 bitter years of a cruel and bloody war for independence from their spanish rulers created a dutch nation. in the middle of the 17th century, seven provinces of the netherlands won their struggle for independence and established the predominantly protestant dutch republic. [bells ringing] in a europe dominated by absolutist and catholic monarchies-- spain, france, austria-- the republic was an island of relative freedom. the town hall of the dutch city of amsterdam, built in the 17th century, tells us something about the ideals of the dutch republic. it has none of the qualities of absolutist architecture. here no grand colonnade leads the world into a central focus as at saint peter's, rome. no succession of rooms and corridors and staircases takes us to the monarch's bedroom as at louis xiv's palace at versailles. here you have seven simple, unpretentious doorways. the architecture of the new town hall, then, is an embodiment of the netherlands' independent political aspirations, an expression of
environment rich with new vocabulary. >> we use big words in here all the time because we are constantly communicating with them about their day. >> for parents, the cost of sending her here is well worth it. >> we wanted to take money that we might've spent on other things and invested in their education. it is not just education, but it is the sense of socialization, and i think it ultimately gets these kids ahead at a young age. >> that on the other side of town, a world apart, they are doing the dishes together. she has seen a change for the better in her daughter, who has started chatting more. >> before i did not give her the chance to express herself. i would be doing most of the talking. now, i give her a chance to express herself, so she does not get frustrated and angry. >> it has already helped some in their daily lives. i can loves her books, tell you, and hopefully that will help her chances. that brings us to a close, but you can continue watching us on our 24-hour news channel. thanks for watching. >> funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation,
. and the only difference is that i grew up in an environment that is a little bit more forgiving. gwen: launching a new effort to help young men and boys of color. covering the week pete williams of nbc news. ed o'keefe of "the washington post." and michael sheerer of "time" magazine. >> award-winning reporting and analysis, covering history as it happens. live from our nation's capital, this is "washington week" with gwen ifill. corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> it's one of the most amazing things we build and it doesn't even fly. we build classrooms and exhibit halls, mentoring tomorrow's innovators, we preserve habitats and serving america's veterans. every day thousands of boeing volunteers help their community be the best they can be, building something better for all of us. >> whether it's discovering an aspirin a day can prevent heart attacks worldwide or regenerating new heart muscles, our goal is to develop treatment. brigham and women's hospital. >> additional corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- prudential. addition funding is
cooperation on the economy, security, defense, and the environment, but those ties are now being tested. well let's get more now from abdul, he is a professor of political science at the uae university, and joins us via skype from dubai. thank you for being with us. this does seem like a very public move in a very conservative region. is there any significant importance to the timing of this decision to withdraw the envoys? >> yeah, this is definitely more than brotherly quarrel here. this is serious. we have not seen anything like this in the 33 years of the gcc, and this time around, you know, we were all surprised that three of the gcc's states decided to pull their ambassador. although it was very clear that they were annoyed towards qatar, very angry -- >> what is behind the anger. what is behind this avowance and anger? >> -- very serious move. >> sorry, you probably didn't hear my question. if you could explain what is behind this anger and annoyance towards qatar? i believe we may have just lost our guest there. abdul. unfortunately we will try, though to get him back on skype though.
environment to work in. we should point out, these three individuals, these al jazeera journalists are among thousands of protesters, activists and other journalists who are facing a similar ordeal many say it's trials like this and other detentions that are a troubling sign that egypt is going back to a repressive, authoritative state instead of going towards fulfilling the promises of the 2011 revolution. >> syrian government forces are waging a campaign of siege warfare and starvation against civilians as part of the military campaign against rebel fighters. >> that's among the findings of a u.n.-mandated independent report which has just been released. the investigation, catalogue of the suffering 250,000 people who are besieged across syria, government forces were accused of denying basic aid in order to force people to choose between surrender and stashation. war crimes have been committed by opposition groups. more from geneva >> reporter: this is that report. 7th report of the independent international commission on inquiry on syria since that commission was set up by the u.n. in 201
of markets with a bad the environment for business? >> he is in answering in mandarin chinese. i could tell you what he is saying but you have to wait. you cannot afford to miss it. [ male announcer ] hands were made for playing. legs, for crossing. feet...splashing. better things than the joint pain and swelling of moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis. if you're trying to ma, now may be time to ask about xeljanz. xeljz (tofacitinib) is a small pill, not an injection or infusion, for adults with moderate to severe ra for whom methotrexate did not work well. xeljanz can lower your ability to fight infections, including tuberculosis. seris, sometimes fatal infections and cancers have happened in patients taking xeljanz. don't start xeljanz if you have any infection, unless ok with your doctor. tears in the stomach or intestines, low bod cell counts and higher liver tes and cholesterol levels have happened. your doctor should perform blood tts before you start and while taking xeljanz, and roinely check certain liver tests. tell your doctor if you have been to a region where certain fungal
environment requires us to requirementize and make difficult choices. some we must make now. >> despite the problems and the cost overruns, the military has no plans to scrap the f35. russia and china are developing fighters that will outgun and outfly the u.s. fleet. the question is whether the pentagon can make good on the promise of a jet that can tackle all threats in all conditions. >> the budget proposal calls for retiring the u2 spy plan for one controlled remotely. >> a pregnant woman apparently drove into the water, driving a minnie van with her three children, ages 10, 9 and 3. life guards and other beach goers rushed in. they pulled all for to safety before the van was submerged by the waves. one of the children told rescue areas, "mummy is trying to kill us, please help." the mother was incoherent, uncooperative. she is undergoing psychiatric evaluation, the children have been placed in protective custody. >> tex joons have gone to the polls. greg abbott peat out eight other candidates, facing off against wendy davis. she is the first female nom ni since ann richards in 1994
to run my state the bay i want to. let me make the environment such that i can promote jobs in my own state. i don't need the federal government doing this for me. >> but i think you need to look at the entire tax code. do you realize -- >> but you shouldn't be paying 15% when people making less than you are paying a higher rate. >> but if i -- >> that nibt be the case for you. you pit it in harm's way, you're investing it? >> that's another way to say it. >> depending on what you're doing could be putting it in harm's way to lose it. >> put in bitcoins. >> but when you're putting other people's money in harm's way, this goes back to what we talked about before, as the private equity manager, why is that -- why is that the not a commission oriented business? >> when you see somebody make $500 million of which a large portion of it is in carried pictures. that's what private equity is. i redeploy it all the time. i'm constantly buying new deals. why would you want me to stop doing that? >> it's not a matter of punishing you. it's a matter of giving you special status. and i'm not argui
room in a portfolio for equities in an environment of low rates, even if they're going higher, they're going higher in a very slow fashion, if you want. growth is subdued but is still supportive. so that's overall an environment where you want to be in stocks. >> you know, you're the big picture type of investor, and the big picture for the u.s. market for the last four years has been all of the easy money policy from the federal reserve and plenty of people feel like that's why we are sitting at all-time highs right now. so why wouldn't it reverse itself as the fed begins to pull back on the easy money and even if it starts to raise interest rates sooner rather than later, why isn't this a time when the market starts to retreat, where are we still going higher now? >> well, i think although, you know, we're expecting a normalization of rates at some point in the future, we're not talking about something very quick or very drastic. and at the same time the world is healing from its traumatic experience, if you want, from the crisis. so all of this is supportive. now, actually, clear
)-right-paren so they are savvy in the global media environment. >> if they become more influential in the post 14 afghanistan or if they are candidates that are sympathetic and win a seat or two if they are going to be a part of the game or if they are going to be fighting, which i guess they are in some places. if they might somehow get engaged in governing, could they possibly tolerate other voices? can be mature to the level they allow other people to speak as well as them in a more serious afghanistan than the one they ran previously. >> the short answer of that is probably not. there's a lot of wishful thinking that has gone on about the telegram. you could imagine that a woman's are in the political process but they are a relatively small part of that equation. i think the single biggest wild card is what the pakistanis do a serious military operation in north was there a -- wasserstein and the people that have been told has reached the point where the sharif government has said we are serious and that could change for the telegram if they no longer have a safe haven or they
that an environment of low rates, low interest rates, especially when it p prevails for a long time, and we have had a long period of low interest rates can give rise to behavior that poses threats to financial stability. and therefore we need to be looking at that very carefully. and we are doing so in a very thorough way, i believe. there are a number of things that we are monitoring. measures of asset prices and whether or not they appear to be diverging from historical norms. namely it's hard but trying to spot any asset price bubbles that might be emerging. we're looking at leverage, which build up in leverage can be very dangerous to the financial system and pose stability risks. we're looking at trends in leverage. we're looking at credit growth to see whether or not that has potentially worrisome trends. in addition to that we're looking the particularly through the stress tests at financial institutions and a low interest rate environment. we have to worry about whether or not they're appropriately dealing with interest rate risk ls. we have been looking at that and, in fact, our current st
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